Grahamstown Journal

Grahamstown Journal 1883 03 March

Saturday 3 March 1883

WARRANT OF APPREHENSION
Alexander BISSET Esq, Resident Magistrate for the District of Humansdorp
To the Field-cornets, Constables, Police Officers and other Officers of the Law proper to the execution of Criminal Warrants.
Whereas from information taken upon oath before me, there are reasonable grounds of suspicion against Piet TOBIAS alias Piet LEFLEUR, that he did, on the 6th day of August 1882, commit the crime of Theft.
These are therefore, in Her Majesty’s name, to command you that immediately upon sight hereof you apprehend and bring the said Piet TOBIAS alias Piet LEFLEUR, or cause him to be apprehended and brought before me, to be examined and to answer to the said information, and to be further dealt with according to Law.
Given under my hand at Grahamstown this 22nd day of February 1883
Signed A. BISSET RM
Description of Piet TOBIAS alias Piet LEFLEUR
A bastard, native of Capetown, very dark complexion, about 25 years of age, straight black hair, black moustache with a little hair on chin, full round face. Dressed in a black coat, one arm torn, brown cord trousers, black [stasher] hat, large pair of [obscured] boots with nails. Formerly in the service of the Rend, VAN RYAN.
This prisoner made his escape from the escort at Fort Brown on the 28th February last.

Monday 5 March 1883

WARRANT OF APPREHENSION
Charles Hugh HUNTLY Esq, Resident Magistrate for the District of Albany
To the Field-cornets, Constables, Police Officers and other Officers of the Law proper to the execution of Criminal Warrants.
Whereas from information taken upon oath before me, there are reasonable grounds of suspicion against PIETTERSON, alias HOBSEN, alias MEYER, that he did, on or about the 26th day of February, commit the crime of Theft.
These are therefore, in Her Majesty’s name, to command you that immediately upon sight hereof you apprehend and bring the said PIETTERSON, alias HOBSEN, alias MEYER, or cause him to be apprehended and brought before me, to be examined and to answer to the said information, and to be further dealt with according to Law.
Given under my hand at Grahamstown this 2nd day of March 1883
Signed C.H. HUNTLY, Resident Magistrate
Description of PIETTERSON, alias HOBSEN, alias MEYER. A German, about 36 years of age, about 5ft 7 in, broad shoulders, with a coarse forbidden [sic] countenance, light moustache only, scar or sore on cheekbone.

Many residents in Grahamstown and district will hear with regret of the death of Mr. PARSONS, late Chief Constable, which took place yesterday afternoon at his residence on Somerset Street. Mr. PARSONS was a well-known figure in town, having for 25 years occupied the position of Chief Constable, in which capacity he gained the esteem of all. He was the pattern of a police-officer, active, vigilant and thoroughly attentive. When he received his appointment in 1854 he came with good credentials from the Rifle Brigade, in which he had served as a non-commissioned officer, enjoying as a good-conduct soldier a small pension, under the Chelsea pensions. After retaining office for 25 years he in the latter part of 1879 resigned, and sought rest after his long and active service. He suffered severely from gravel, and made a trip to England to seek relief, returning after a short absence. He has been confined to his bed for some time, and during his illness was attended by the Rev. Maurice DAVIES, who delivered the Communion to him on last Saturday afternoon. The funeral takes place tomorrow at three in the afternoon, and in accordance with a request made by the deceased several days before his death, will be followed by the Resident Magistrate and the whole of the City Police.

Tuesday 6 March 1883

DIED at Grahamstown on the 5th inst, aged 64 years, Edward KING, much and deservedly respected.
The Funeral of the late Mr. E. KING will move from his residence, Market-sq., tomorrow (Wednesday) afternoon at four o’clock. Friends are respectfully invited.
A. WILL, Undertaker.

Mr. Edward KING, who was formerly in the army, from which he retired on a pension, and has been for many years past settles in Grahamstown, died yesterday evening at his residence, after a short but severe illness. He was at his usual employment on Friday, but on Saturday last became seriously unwell. The disease was an obstruction of the bowels, but with symptoms of failure of the action of the heart. By the skill of his medical attendant, Dr. PEMBERTON, the obstruction was overcome, but the symptoms of heart-failure became more alarming. In consultation with Dr. E. ATHERSTONE every effort was made to restore the heart’s action, but in vain: and he died about 6pm yesterday. Mr KING had been, for a number of years preceding his death, in the employ of Messrs. RICHARDS, SLATER & Co, by whom he was very much respected. He was an active and useful member of the Wesleyan Church, and most consistently adorned his Christian profession. He earned the heart esteem and goodwill of all who knew him, and will be very widely regretted. Mr. KING has left a widow and five children to mourn his loss. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 4 o’clock.

Grahamstown Fire and Marine Assurance Co.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In the Insolvent Estate of B.M. THACKWRAY
The Third Meeting of Creditors in the above Estate will be held before the Resident Magistrate of Grahamstown tomorrow (Wednesday) 7th inst at 10 o’clock in the forenoon, for the Proof of Debts, for Receiving the Trustee’s Report, and also for the purpose of giving directions to the said Trustee as to the management of the said Estate.
D.R. McLACHLAN
Sole Trustee

Wednesday 7 March 1883

A subscription has been opened for the purpose of rendering some assistance to the widow and infant children of the late Mr. Edward KING; and contributions will be thankfully received by Mr. B. ATTWELL, market master, or at the Journal office.

FATAL ACCIDENT
We learn with great regret that a telegram has been received in town which brings the intelligence of the death of Mr. Walter BRADFIELD, of Dordrecht, who most unfortunately shot himself by accident this morning. The deceased was a man in the prime of life, and leaves a widow and eight children. Mrs. BRADFIELD, who has been bereaved of her husband by this sad fatality, is the only daughter of an esteemed minister, Rev. W. HOLDEN, resident in this city. To her, and to Mr. and Mrs. HOLDEN and the afflicted family, we would express our sincerest sympathy.

AN UNCOMMON MARRIAGE
We occasionally hear of marriages taking place between white men and coloured women, but seldom between a coloured man and a white woman. Such an event (says the Kimberley Independent of the 22nd ult) was, however, celebrated with great pomp at St.Augustine’s Church, West End, on Tuesday morning, the Rev C.F. TOBIAS officiating. The newly-married couple were formerly in the service of Mr. James SEDGWICK, West End. The bride is described as being rather good looking.

DEATH BY DROWNING
(Friend, March 1st)
On Friday afternoon last (Independence Day) the town was horror-stricken to hear that Mr. F. HAM, clerk to Mr. Attorney FISCHER of this town, had met his death by drowning whilst bathing at Wolfhouse on the Modder River that morning. A hurriedly written note by Mr. E.S. HANGER, of Wolfhouse, to Mr. FISCHER stating the fact was all that was known on Friday. On Saturday it transpired that Messrs. F. HAM, J. HOPWOOD, Henry HANGER and Clem HANGER, taking advantage of the holiday on Independence Day, left for a three days’ holiday at Wolfhouse on Thursday evening. On the morrow it was proposed to go out shooting. The young fellows, with two others named BECLEY and COLLEY, rose early and went down to the river for a plunge. Some got into the boat. Freddy HAM was one of the first to take the water. Jim HOPWOOD sang out to him “How is the water, Fred?” The poor fellow answered “Oh it is fine!” HOPWOOD proceeded to pull off his boots. When he lifted up his head he enquired where Fred was. No one near knew. COLLET said he saw HAM lift up his arms as if trying the depth of the water, and sink. A search was at once made, but without success. News of the unfortunate affair was at once sent to Mr. HANGER Sen, who did everything within his power to get the body, but without avail. On Saturday Messrs. FISCHER, NORTON and VON HOHNHORST left town for the scene of the catastrophe, about five hours’ ride from town. Upon their arrival they found that Mr. E.S. HANGER had used every means to recover the body, but had been unsuccessful. He had dragged the hole and had fired off dynamite. The new arrivals set to work with a will to assist those who were already engaged. Most of Saturday and Sunday was taken up in dragging and diving for the body, and much more dynamite was fired off, but without the desired effect. The party then returned to town, having left a coffin for the corpse should it be fortunately recovered. On Monday morning, strange to say, the mortal remains of poor Freddy HAM were discovered floating close to the spot where he was last seen. They were immediately brought to town in a horse-wagon. The funeral was one of the largest we have witnessed here; about 200 mourners followed the corpse. The Burial Service in the Cathedral was impressively read by the Ven. Archdeacon CROGHAN, and at the grave by the Right Rev. Douglas McKENZIE, Bishop for Zululand. All the choir and clergy of the Cathedral and the boys of St.Andrew’s College preceded the hearse. His Honour the President was among the mourners. Considerable more people have probably followed, but the time between the arrival of the body in town and the burial was so short many were unaware that the interment was about to take place. We cannot give too much credit to Mr. D.S. HANGER [sic] for the praiseworthy attempts he made to recover the body. We understand that he employed all his coloured people to search, and that he and his two sons did everything in their power to give Christian burial to one who was much beloved by all with whom he came into contact. Freddy HAM, who came to this town as a mere child, and was educated at St.Andrew’s College in the days when Bishop McKENZIE was Principal, was left an orphan a few years ago, and has since been engaged in the office of Mr. Attorney FISCHER, who at all times exhibited the solicitude of a father in his dealings with him, and whose untimely end is, we are sure, more softly felt by no one than by his guardian and benefactor. We do not remember the death of any young person which excited so much sympathy as that of the deceased, who was kind, obliging, simple and loveable, and whose temper was equable to all his friends and acquaintances.

Thursday 8 March 1883

THE LATE CHIEF CONSTABLE
The procession which attended the funeral of the late Chief Constable, Mr. PARSONS, was a very long one. The B.B. of the various lodges in their insignia preceded the coffin, and the friends and relatives of the deceased followed with the City Police and Mr. HUNTLY, C.C. & R.M., and Capt. SIMPKINS. The Rev. Canon DAVIES conducted the service.

Friday 9 March 1883

WARRANT OF APPREHENSION
Charles Hugh HUNTLY Esq, Resident Magistrate for the District of Albany
To the Field-cornets, Constables, Police Officers and other Officers of the Law proper to the execution of Criminal Warrants.
Whereas from information taken upon oath before me, there are reasonable grounds of suspicion against Charles EVANS, that he did, on the 8th day of March 1883, commit the crime of Theft.
These are therefore, in Her Majesty’s name, to command you that immediately upon sight hereof you apprehend and bring the said Charles EVANS, or cause him to be apprehended and brought before me, to be examined and to answer to the said information, and to be further dealt with according to Law.
Given under my hand at Grahamstown this 9th day of March 1883
Signed C.H. HUNTLY, Resident Magistrate
Description of Charles EVANS
European, by trade an engine driver, about 25 years old, height about 5ft 7in, dark hair, also dark brown moustache and beard. When last seen had on a light grey felt hat, one pair pepper and salt trousers (tweed), one single-breasted coat, marks of paint on the cuffs and corner, also small blue cloth jacket under the other. Supposed to have gone to Alicedale.

MARRIED by Special Licence at Queenstown, on the 7th March, by the Rev. S. Vyvyan, John HAWKINS to Jemima DYKE, both of Lombard’s Post, Southwell.

DEATH OF MR. WALTER JOHN BRADFIELD
The following telegram has been received of the sad accident by which Mr. BRADFIELD lost his life: “Inquest, open verdict on BRADFIELD. Gun discharged by dropping butt on ground while cocked.” This sad and [unsp…..] has cast a gloom not only over the family connections of Mr. BRADFIELD but also over the whole community of Dordrecht and the district, where he was highly respected. Mr. BRADFIELD was the only son of the late John BRADFIELD Esq of [Rongola] near Queenstown, who was one of the settlers of 1820. The mother of Walter was the sister of the late Mrs. JENKINS of Pondoland and of the Rev. Charles WHITE, Wesleyan Missionary of Butterworth. The sisters of the deceased are Mrs. Charles BROWN, wife of the Hon. Charles BROWN of Queenstown, Mrs E. WARNER, wife of the Rev Ebenezer WARNER, Wesleyan Missionary, and Mrs. BOYD, widow of the late Capt. BOYD, who was killed in the last Kafir war, when [behind] the levies in British Kaffraria. By this melancholy event he leaves a widow and nine children, with many relatives and friends, to mourn a premature loss. He was struck down in a moment, in the pride of manhood. He belonged to the Wesleyan Church, and for some time past had had Divine worship conducted in his house, which was a few miles from Dordrecht, by the Minister from that place.
“In the midst of life we are in death”.

The funeral of the late Mr. Edward KING took place on Wednesday afternoon in the Wesleyan Cemetery. A large number of the friends of the deceased formed the procession. The service at the grave was read by the Rev. J. WALTON, assisted by Rev. E. LONES. There were also present Revs. J. MOUNTAIN, R.W. LEWIS and T.H. WAINMAN. A short address was given by Mr. WALTON, in which he spoke of the high qualities and estimable character of the deceased.

FATAL ACCIDENT THROUGH BURNING
(Queenstown Standard, March 7th)
Mr. F. SCHERMBRUCKER, Assistant R.M., held an inquest on Friday morning last at the Court House into the circumstances which caused the death of Elizabeth STOKES. Deceased was the adopted daughter of Henry LANGLEY, the keeper of the Railway Gates, near the Railway Cottages.
Henry LANGLY said that the deceased was his adopted daughter. About 3:20, as near as possible, on Tuesday afternoon, he called out “Lizzie, ‘tis time to put the dinner on”. She then went into the kitchen. He took no further notice of her, but soon after heard an explosion as though of blasting. He went towards the kitchen door. She came from the fireplace. The first words she said were “Oh Daddy”. I laid hold of the counterpane. She was all in flames, from her feet to her hair. That was all she then said. He then took off a pair of double blankets and put round her, and took off the counterpane, the fringe of which had got lighted. She was then quite sensible. He went out on the bank and screamed out for help. The fireplace was also on fire. He threw the counterpane against it; but had first put the double pair of blankets round the girl. Mrs. RICHARDSON and a young an (PHILLIPS) at the pumping station then came. After he had given the alarm, she had thrown the blankets off. Her flesh was all charred. She commenced to tear her charred clothes off. He sent for Dr. BERRY. She said it was her own fault. Mrs. RICHARDSON and he succeeded in tearing her clothes off. They put her on a stretcher before Dr. BERRY came. She was still sensible and quite cheerful. After Dr. BERRY had dressed her she was taken to the Hospital on the stretcher in a wagon. The cause of the explosion he could not give, beyond that he believed it was caused by paraffin. The bottle was found the next morning in the kitchen, or rather a part of it. The neck of the bottle was blown off. She did not tell me how the accident happened. The only way I can account for it is through the paraffin. She said she ought not to have done it. He was certain “the child” (deceased) told him she was putting paraffin on the fire to light it up. Had seen her do so before, and checked her for it several times. She was fifteen on the 12th October last.
Jane RICHARDSON said she lived near the Railway Gates, near Mr. LANGLEY’s cottage. She answered the call of the last witness on Tuesday last in the afternoon. She heard a report like a gun. Mr. LANGLEY cried out for help. The deceased was in her place five minutes before. PHILLIPS and she went down to LANGLEY’s. When she got there she found the skin dripping off her. She hesitated before she went in as she was tired. The flames were out when she and PHILLIPS went into the house. She put flour all over her till Dr. BERRY came. She had observed smoke coming out of the cottage. She stripped her and stayed till DR. BERRY came. She died about two o’clock on Wednesday morning. A Kafir woman who was cleaning out the place after the accident picked up the bottle which had exploded. The kitchen was on fire. Two young Dutchmen put it out. (The inquest was adjourned till Saturday morning for Dr. BERRY’s evidence, but, as he was still absent from town, the case was again adjourned till Monday.)

Saturday 10 March 1883

BIRTH at the Manse, Graaff-Reinet, on the 9th inst, the wife of the Rev. Ellis J. WILLIAMS of a son.

Monday 12 March 1883

BIRTH at [Grahamstown] on the 12th inst, the wife of J. [SOUTHEY[ of a son

DIED at his residence “Braakfontein”, Alexandria, on the 7th March 1883, Mr. Cornelius [KROG], aged 60 years.

Tuesday 13 March 1883

MARRIED at Grahamstown on Monday the 12th inst, John Kidger STRETTON, son of Henry STRETTON of Stormberg, to Annie Maria MATTHEWS, youngest daughter of Stephen Lewis MATTHEWS (deceased).

DEATH OF MR. MORRIS
We regret we (Alice Times) record the death on Wednesday of Mr. William MORRIS of this town. The late Mr. MORRIS had suffered keenly for two months from asthma, which he bore with great fortitude and Christian resignation. Deceased was a son of Mr. John MORRIS, one of the British Settlers of 1820. He was a lad of nine years old when [they] landed. He was a man of great [obscured] force of character, and took an active [interest] of many of the most stirring [obscured] late. He had brought up a large family, [obscured] of whom had grown to manhood; [Samuel] James MORRIS, of the Umtata [obscured] W.J. MORRIS, Magistrate of [obscured] Geo. MRRIS of Queenstown [obscured] of the deceased. We tender Mrs. MORRIS and all the relatives our sincere [sympathy]. The funeral took place yesterday [obscured] when a large number of persons [followed] the remains to their last resting [place in the] cemetery. The service in the [Wesleyan chapel] was conducted by the Revds. [obscured] and R.H. BROTHERTON. [rest of notice rubbed away]

Thursday 15 March 1883

A gentleman in town (says the Herald), who spent Sunday with LEPPAN in the police cell, says the culprit is quite prepared to meet his fate. He has written a letter thanking the Judge for the kindness shown him during his trial, but adheres to the statement that he never intended to kill his wife. He says that the date of his execution may be fixed for as early as possible.

Friday 16 March 1883

DIED at his residence on the Farm “Botha’s Hoek”, Division of Wodehouse, Walter John BRADFIELD, aged 44 years.
Friends at a distance will please accept this notice.
Dordrecht, 9th March 1883.

SHOCKING SUICIDE
A farmer named FAITH, of German nationality, committed suicide (says the Dispatch) by hanging on his premises at Amalinda on Friday last. It appears that he had just returned from his land, where he had been planting mealies, and nothing extraordinary was noticed about his manner. He went to an outhouse and there took a riem and passed it over a rafter, and hanged himself. Those who saw how the act had been committed say it showed great determination. The wife of the unfortunate man found him suspended just when life was extinct, and Mr. Field-cornet TAYLOR was shortly afterwards in attendance. An enquiry was afterwards held and a verdict returned in accordance with the facts. The deceased man leaves a young family. He came to this country from Germany some few years ago with money, which he invested in farming, and at one time was doing very well, but whether he had lately become less successful we are not aware.

Saturday 17 March 1883

THE LATE DR. SHILLITO
The following notice from an eminent M.D. reached the Uitenhage Times last Monday. “On Saturday died at Uitenhage, Joseph SHILLITO M.D, deeply lamented by all who had the privilege of truly knowing him. As a companion he was singularly pleasant; and as a friend warm and thorough. His noble and commanding appearance, soft and kindly manners, which charmed everyone who met him, added to superior intellectual endowments and sound professional knowledge, always abreast of the times, rendered him eminently qualified to take a prominent position among the medical practitioners of the Colony. Peace to his ashes!” We learn that Dr. SHILLITO was only 45 years old. His long grey beard and venerable countenance gave him the appearance of greater age. We believe he caught jungle fever in India, from which he never recovered.

Monday 19 March 1883

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In the Insolvent Estate of Caarl QUERL
All Persons claiming to be Creditors under this Estate are required to take notice that the undersigned has been duly elected to and confirmed in the appointment of Sole Trustee of the said Estate, and that the Master has appointed the Third Meeting to be held before the Resident Magistrate of Albany on Wednesday April 18th 1883 at 10 o’clock in the forenoon, for the Proof of Debts, for receiving the Trustee’s Report, and also for the purpose of giving directions to the said Trustee as to the management of the said Estate. And all Persons indebted to the said Estate are required to pay the same to the Undersigned, on or before the 11th April 1883, or proceedings will be instituted against them.
W.B. SHAW,
Sole Trustee

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In the Insolvent Estate of Robert SHORE
All Persons claiming to be Creditors under this Estate are required to take notice that the undersigned has been duly elected to and confirmed in the appointment of Sole Trustee of the said Estate, and that the Master has appointed the Third Meeting to be held before the Resident Magistrate of Albany on Wednesday April 18th 1883 at 10 o’clock in the forenoon, for the Proof of Debts, for receiving the Trustee’s Report, and also for the purpose of giving directions to the said Trustee as to the management of the said Estate. And all Persons indebted to the said Estate are required to pay the same to the Undersigned, on or before the 11th April 1883, or proceedings will be instituted against them.
W.B. SHAW,
Sole Trustee

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In the Insolvent Estate of David WILSON
All Persons claiming to be Creditors under this Estate are required to take notice that the undersigned has been duly elected to and confirmed in the appointment of Sole Trustee of the said Estate, and that the Master has appointed the Third Meeting to be held before the Resident Magistrate of Albany on Wednesday April 18th 1883 at 10 o’clock in the forenoon, for the Proof of Debts, for receiving the Trustee’s Report, and also for the purpose of giving directions to the said Trustee as to the management of the said Estate. And all Persons indebted to the said Estate are required to pay the same to the Undersigned, on or before the 11th April 1883, or proceedings will be instituted against them.
W.B. SHAW,
Sole Trustee

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In the Insolvent Estate of Frederick PADDOCK
All Persons claiming to be Creditors under this Estate are required to take notice that the undersigned has been duly elected to and confirmed in the appointment of Sole Trustee of the said Estate, and that the Master has appointed the Third Meeting to be held before the Resident Magistrate of Albany on Wednesday April 18th 1883 at 10 o’clock in the forenoon, for the Proof of Debts, for receiving the Trustee’s Report, and also for the purpose of giving directions to the said Trustee as to the management of the said Estate. And all Persons indebted to the said Estate are required to pay the same to the Undersigned, on or before the 11th April 1883, or proceedings will be instituted against them.
W.B. SHAW,
Sole Trustee

FATAL ACCIDENT
A fatal accident occurred at Kromme River Heights on Saturday last under the following circumstances. Two dogs were fighting in front of Mr. FERREIRA’s homestead, and his two sons Honoratus and Heracles came out to separate them. The former had a loaded gun and stuck the dogs with the butt, when the weapon exploded and lodged the charge in his brother’s neck behind the ear. Death (says the Telegraph) resulted two hours later.

Thursday 22 March 1883

THE SOMERSET EAST MURDER
The following is an extract containing what is of public interest, from a letter sent by Professor KYD to the G.E. Advertiser, and published in that paper on the 20th inst. After complaining of the suppression at the trial of information that could throw light on the case, it goes on to say:
The defence had secured a great advantage. The letters of the murdered wife were excluded, but the “fatal letters”, being part of the prisoner’s declaration, must be read, and with them Mr. SOLOMON’s eloquence, the capital noting of the prisoner and his hysterical grief whenever his wife’s name was mentioned, it was not at all impossible that they might extract a verdict of “Culpable Homicide” from the jury.
There was one trifling obstacle to the success of this scheme the “Fatal Letters” [were evidence]. They rested on the bare word of the prisoner in a declaration which was proved whenever it came into contact with independent testimony to be a tissue of lies. In fact the judge swept away the whole of Mr. SOLOMON’s brilliant oration with the simple words “These letters are not evidence”, and Mr. SOLOMON knew perfectly well that this was exactly what the judge would say. And he could have prevented [obscured] he chose. If the letters were genuine he could easily have made them evidence. He had nothing to do but put Jurie KEMP in the box and ask him the simple question “Did you write these letters?” and the thing was done. The “fatal letters” would then have been evidence, the Judge would have been obliged to comment upon them, and the jury to take them into consideration. But Mr. SOLOMON did not dare to [examine] Jurie KEMP. He got every advantage too. Mr. BROWN offered to put Jurie KEMP in the box as a Crown witness, to ask no questions himself, but simply hand him over to the tender mercies of Mr. SOLOMON. But Mr. SOLOMON did not dare to examine him. When a lawyer thus refuses to examine an important witness he virtually abandons his case, and Mr. SOLOMON voluntarily ran the risk rather than put Jurie KEMP in the box. He evidently thought that it would have been more dangerous to examine Jurie KEMP than to decline to examine him, and I think so too. But a person can’t eat his cake and have it, and Mr. SOLOMON had no right after fatally damaging “the fatal letter” to use them as he did in his address to the jury.
Allow me now in one word to explain how my daughter, who was so nobly, I may say fatally, reticent as to her husband’s faults to all the outside world, should have spoken so freely on the subject to John NEL. John NEL was the brother-in-law of the wretched girl whose disgraceful connexion with LEPPAN was the cause of the murder. He and her brother Jurie KEMP knew of this connexion, had done their best to put a stop to it, and were the only persons to whom the poor injured wife could, without ruining her husband, breathe out her sorrows or ask sympathy or assistance.
I may also state that in my efforts to clear my poor murdered girl’s character, I have been seriously hampered by the extraordinary manner in which the case was managed by the authorities in Somerset. The murder was committed before 2am, and the prisoner was not arrested till 11. Even after that, the house remained in the undisputed possession of LEPPAN’s most unscrupulous partisans all that day, and part of the next. During the 9 hours between the murder and the arrest the prisoner was master of the situation. He managed to send off two expresses, one to Mimosa Grove and one to Zwager’s Hoek, conveying to his parents and his sister the stereotyped information “Poor Jessie died last night. Come at once.” These expresses were sent off so early that his father and mother passed Cookhouse Drift 45 miles from Somerset soon after 6 o’clock am. The murderer had thus full time to put his house in order, before stripping himself to his shirt and trowsers to go for the doctor. And he set his house in order thoroughly. He was no stupid ignorant blunderer. He was a shrewd experienced attorney. He knew what to destroy and what to leave as evidence, and he did his work so effectually, and the supineness of the authorities was so great, that I believe Mr. SOLOMON was right when he said that if the prisoner had held his tongue he would have been acquitted. I am sure that during those nine hours valuable evidence was destroyed. On the 12th Dec Miss KEMP, writing to the prisoner, reproaches him with carelessness in regard to her letter, tells him that two of them had been lost already, and enjoining him that for the future he must on receipt of her letters either burn them, tear them to pieces, or lock them up in his secret drawers. The prisoner wrote to me after he was committed to trial that they had searched for letters from Miss KEMP to him but found none, but had found Jurie KEMP’s letters to “poor Jessie”. I think the public will agree with me that the failure of the one search, and the success of the other, was exactly what might have been expected. As to what was done in the house during the day and a half his friends were in possession of it I know a good deal, but shall only mention what everybody knows – that during that time the clothes of the murdered woman were given by the prisoner’s sister to be washed.
In these circumstances it is almost a miracle that I have a scrap of [evidence] of my poor daughter’s innocence, and [in these circumstances] I think the murdered woman… [rest of paragraph rubbed away]
Signed
Thomas KYD.

Saturday 24 March 1883

DIED at his residence, Hounslow, on Friday 23rd March, William HYDE, [aged ..] years and 5 months.
Mrs. HYDE and family return their sincere thanks for the many and great kindnesses they have received from their numerous friends.
The Funeral leaves the residence of Mr. W. WATSON Sen, African-street, tomorrow (Sunday) afternoon at 4pm. All friends are invited to attend.

Wednesday 28 March 1883

DIED at his residence, Hounslow, on 23rd March 1883, in the 59th year of his age, William HYDE, only son of the late John Kepel HYDE of Berkshire, England.

Friday 30 March 1883

MARRIED at Alexandria on the 27th inst, John Reay SHAW, son of the Rev. Barnabus J. SHAW, to Charlotte Louisa, [third] daughter of John VAN RYNEVELD, and granddaughter of W.C. VAN RYNEVELD, late Civil Commissioner of Graaff-Reinet.

BIRTH on Thursday March 29th, the wife of Mr. W.A. PHILLIPS, Masonic Hotel, of a daughter.

Print Email

Newspapers elsewhere

Visitors to this site

So far today:So far today:684
Yesterday:Yesterday:1644
So far this week:So far this week:570
currently online: 21